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Thursday, 22 September 2016

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

In this issue: The latest additions to the Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide

Climate change

With a focus across adaptation, mitigation & development, the climate change guide covers agriculture & food security, natural resource management, poverty & vulnerability, governance, health, gender, finance, & low carbon energy.

HOME LATEST NEWS TOPICS COUNTRY PROFILES JOBS CONTACT

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

22 September 2016
Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide: http://www.eldis.org/climate

This is our regular bulletin that highlights recent publications on climate change and development issues.

The documents are available without charge on the web. If you are unable to access any of these materials online and would like to receive a copy of a document as an email attachment, please contact our editor at the email address given below.


In this issue:

 



Climate resilient development: experience from an African capacity development programme
Produced by: (2016)

This learning brief presents insights and lessons learned from a capacity development programme on water security and climate resilient development covering eight countries in Africa – Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tunisia and Zimbabwe. The programme engaged some 140 participants and 30 lecturers/mentors, and held over 50 workshops. Large investments were made in the development of learning material in three languages (English, French and Portuguese), the establishment of national management and lecturing units, and building a strong sense of programme ownership in each country.

The capacity to promote water security and integrate climate change considerations into national planning processes is still limited in most of the eight countries. However, following the implementation of this programme, much has been learned by individual participants, their home institutions, and engaged lecturers, and there are now many ongoing initiatives that promote the inclusion of climate change considerations in national development efforts. There is great scope both to extend the programme for several more rounds in the same countries, and to expand to other countries. With significant efforts already invested into the development of learning materials and training of trainers (ToT), the cost per participant will be much reduced in future new programmes.


Available online at: http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/WaterCapacity_Final_WEB.pdf Back to list
Becoming a climate-resilient green economy: planning for climate compatible development in Ethiopia
Authors: R. Redda; R. Roland

Produced by: Climate and Development Knowledge Network (2016)

Ethiopia has emerged as one of Africa's champions in responding to the implications of climate change. This is demonstrated by the strong commitment shown by the country's political leadership on the issues. Much of this commitment has been driven by the impacts of climatic events in Ethiopia, mainly the drought episodes that have hit the country since the early 1970s. These experiences have contributed to the widespread understanding that climate change can have severe consequences, and has the potential to hold back economic progress and reverse the gains made in Ethiopia's development.
 
This Working Paper documents Ethiopia's lessons from the study 'Lesson learning from national climate compatible development planning', which aimed to capture and share institutional experiences of climate compatible development, and provide recommendations for the future. Kenya, Mozambique and Rwanda also participated.
 
Conclusions and lessons learned:
 
Establishing a climate-resilient green economy is a nationally owned process and a priority for Ethiopia. It is being driven domestically, with substantive investments – being made from national budgets, international climate finance, and multilateral and bilateral partners. As a result, there are several large-scale initiatives underway in a range of priority sectors, which will bring about substantial climate-resilience and low-carbon benefits.

Other decision-makers and development practitioners can learn from the Ethiopian experience, which includes the following lessons:
 
  • financing from international climate funds should be available to countries that pursue a holistic, ambitious and nationally driven development agenda that includes climate-related goals, such as zero growth in net carbon emissions or enhancing the adaptive capacity of communities. The opportunities presented by international climate funds set the tempo for Ethiopia to realign its strategic thinking in order to attract this financing for climate compatible development
  • engagement by political champions enhances the development and implementation of the governance and institutional arrangements, strategies and frameworks needed for climate compatible development
  • robust governance and institutional structures form a strong basis for establishing effective cross-government working relations. These are important for the development and implementation of climate compatible development interventions, which are inherently cross-cutting in nature
  • collaboration between the ministries responsible for finance and the environment creates a solid platform for the coordinated implementation and mainstreaming of climate compatible development into national development plans
  • commitment, ownership, nationally driven investments and the demonstration of results on the ground are critical for unlocking additional finance to implement climate compatible development programmes and projects
  • in planning and mainstreaming climate compatible development, decision-makers should give consideration to long-term technical and institutional capacity development, particularly in terms of the ongoing need to prepare fundable project and programme proposals and subsequently to implement these

Available online at: http://cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Green-economy-Ethiopia.pdf Back to list
Climate change complicates Dengue fever prevention in Can Tho
Produced by: Institute For Social And Environmental Transition (2016)

Can Tho in Vietnam is a growing city of about one million people, approximately half of whom live in the city's peripheral rural districts. Rapid land conversion and population increase in peri-urban areas just outside the high-density urban core means that new residents are moving into areas that still have a lot of open space and limited public health infrastructure. Dengue fever incidence has increased in Can Tho in recent years. Recent migrants who live in poor quality housing conditions are especially vulnerable.
 
Disease transmission is linked to mosquito activity, which increases as the temperature rises and as there is more access
to clean water for breeding. Climate change can lead to increased populations of the Aedes aegyptii mosquito that carries dengue and an expansion of the species' range. This project studied the empirical connection between dengue fever incidence and climate parameters in Can Tho city. It also tested responses designed to increase the capacity of public health staff and city residents to reduce exposure to dengue including creating new institutions for health promotion.
 
Lessons for policy and practice:
 
The project results show the importance of community-based monitoring, and awareness and prevention practices for dengue fever as climate change leads to greater mosquito activity in the Mekong Delta. Surveillance methods should include multiple indicators of dengue risk in order to focus preventive measures in areas where risks are higher. Larval monitoring is critical to enable timely and targeted mosquito control. These methods require the engagement of community actors and other city agencies (e.g. Department of Education, ward officials) in addition to Department of Health staff. Health clubs can serve an important role in community development and promoting health outcomes, including dengue fever prevention.
 
 

Available online at: http://i-s-e-t.org/file_download/22e61f83-b684-41e9-8986-ad18133722a4 Back to list
How do gender approaches improve climate compatible development? Lessons from India
Authors: R. Sogani; K.R. Viswanathan; R. Clements

Produced by: Climate and Development Knowledge Network (2016)

Although evidence shows that women are both victims of climate change and important contributors of knowledge and skills in disaster risk, adaptation and mitigation strategies, the gender perspective is largely missing from the design and planning of climate change responses and policies. In addition, most research into gender and climate change has been exclusively conducted in rural contexts. There is strong scope for filling these knowledge gaps to improve the understanding of the relationship between gender and climate change in urban settings.
 
This policy brief explores the advantages and challenges of integrating a gender dimension into climate compatible development strategies in urban settings, with a focus on the Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) project in India. An initiative funded by The Rockefeller Foundation, the project was implemented in Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh by the Gorakhpur Environmental Action Group (GEAG).
 
Key messages:
  • urban scenarios in India are highly complex, with many social dimensions in terms of caste, gender and class. As such, a gender-sensitive approach to climate compatible development is fundamentally different in cities, compared with one in rural areas
  • urban residents demonstrate different vulnerabilities and capacities for facing the impacts of climate change than people living in rural areas, principally: weaker social cohesion, with the result that women and marginalised people are more dependent on external help in times of need; a higher likelihood of flooding and waterlogging due to poor infrastructure and basic services; and a higher likelihood of food insecurity
  • project activities should be adapted to address these gender differences, for example, by working through community volunteers and arranging meetings to suit men and women's availability
  • popular participatory methods developed in the context of rural settings can be adapted to suit the urban setting. In the case of the ACCCRN project, this involved undertaking Participatory Urban Appraisals through several smaller meetings, so as to understand the diversity of factors and issues involved

Available online at: http://cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/India-gender-brief-FINAL.pdf Back to list
Climate extremes and resilient poverty reduction
Authors: E. Wilkinson; K. Peters

Produced by: Overseas Development Institute (2015)

Building resilience to climate extremes and disasters will help ensure the success of global efforts to eliminate extreme poverty. Reaching and sustaining zero extreme poverty, the first of the SDGs, requires a collective effort to manage the risks of current
climate extremes and projected climate change.
 
This report explores the relationships between climate change and poverty, focusing on climate extremes, on the basis that these manifestations of climate change will most affect our attempts to reduce poverty over the next 15 to 25 years. Framed by a wider analysis, three detailed studies – on drought risk in Mali, heatwaves in India and typhoons in the Philippines – illustrate the relationship between climate change, climate extremes, disasters and poverty impacts.
 
All three case studies show the disproportionate impact of climate extremes on those living below the poverty line and those who suffer from non-income dimensions of poverty. Immediate impacts on poor households include loss of life (and associated loss of household earnings), illness, and loss of crops and other assets. Longer-term effects include increases in the price of staple foods, a reduction in food security, malnourishment, malnutrition and stunting in children, as well as lower educational attainment.
 
The report calls for improved resilience to climate extremes as a requisite for achieving poverty reduction targets. To achieve this, planners and policy makers will need to support the strengthening of the absorptive, anticipatory and adaptive capacities of communities and societies. New ways of working are required to link institutions that have previously been poorly connected, with new criteria for decision-making, such as considering the best solutions across different possible climate futures. The scale of the challenge suggests more transformative actions may be necessary, including through the use of new risk financing mechanisms.

Available online at: https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/10130.pdf Back to list
World heritage and tourism in a changing climate
Produced by: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (2016)

There are more than 1000 World Heritage properties in 163 countries and a great many of them are important tourist destinations. At its best, tourism drives economic development and brings needed financial and social benefits, but, as this report demonstrates, rapid or unplanned tourism developments, or excessive visitor numbers, can also have a negative effect on the properties. Climate change is likely to exacerbate existing stresses and bring direct impacts of its own. Sea-level rise, higher temperatures, habitat shifts and more frequent extreme weather events such as storms, floods and droughts, all have the potential to rapidly and permanently change or degrade the very attributes that make World Heritage sites such popular tourist destinations.
 
This report and its case studies demonstrate the urgent need to better understand, monitor and address climate change threats to World Heritage sites.

Available online at: http://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/attach/2016/05/world-heritage-and-tourism-in-a-changing-climate.pdf Back to list
Climate and disaster resilience
Produced by: World Bank Publications (2016)

The Pacific region is known to be one of the most exposed to natural hazards and climate change in the world. Pacific Island Countries (PICs) are exposed to a wide variety of natural hazards , including cyclones, droughts, earthquakes, electrical storms, extreme winds, floods, landslides, storm surges, tsunami and volcanic eruptions . Some of these hazards will be exacerbated by climate change. Average ocean and land temperatures are increasing, and the seasonality and duration of rainfall is changing. Over the coming decades, tropical cyclones are expected to increase in intensity, though not necessarily in frequency, and to move closer to the equator . Because of higher ocean temperature and ice sheet melt, sea level is risin g, thereby worsening coastal erosion and saline intrusion and increasing the severity of storm surges. All these impacts adversely affects agriculture, fisheries, coastal zones, water resources, health, and ecosystems and thus threaten entire communities a nd economies. The mere existence of low -lying atoll island nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and RMI is threatened by sea level rise and storm surges , since they are only 1 -3m above sea level.

This report hightlights that:

  • people and economies in the Pacific are particularly vulnerable to hazard and climate change impacts because of geographical remoteness and isolation, dispersion across a large area in the Pacific Ocean, economic and social challenges and the degradation of natural resources
  • despite a consensus that PICs will be disproportionately impacted by climate change, assessing the future cost of climate-change impacts in the Pacific Region is challenging
  • despite these challenges, it is possible to design resilient development strategies using new decision frameworks

 

 


Available online at: http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/720371469614841726/PACIFIC-POSSIBLE-Climate.pdf Back to list
Climate impacts on food security and livelihoods in Asia: a review of existing knowledge
Produced by: United Nations [UN] World Food Programme (2016)

There is agreement in the scientific community that the global food system will experience unprecedented pressure in the coming decades – demographic changes, urban growth, environmental degradation, increasing disaster risk, food price volatility, and climate change will all affect food security patterns.
 
The Asian continent is particularly vulnerable to climate change due to a combination of: high reliance on climate-sensitive livelihoods, high incidence of poverty and food insecurity, and high population densities in vulnerable and areas highly exposed to climate-related hazards such as floods, cyclones and droughts, and long-term climate change such as gradual changes in monsoon patterns, glacier melt and sea-level rise.
 
The purpose of this primer is to review the current state of knowledge on the relationship between climate change and food security, focusing specifically on the Asian context, to provide an evidence base for discussion and further analysis.

Available online at: http://documents.wfp.org/stellent/groups/public/documents/newsroom/wfp281745.pdf Back to list

 

 


See our Climate Change Resource Guide for a complete list of new additions.

You are welcome to re-use material from this bulletin on your own website but please acknowledge Eldis as the source and include a link to the Eldis website (either to our home page or to the home page of one of our Resource Guides). Eldis data is available under a creative commons license and made it accessible via an Open API for others to re-use. In addition we have developed a number of plug-ins and modules for website content management systems such as WordPress, Joomla and Drupal to make it easier for website managers and bloggers to integrate Eldis content into their sites. See http://www.eldis.org/go/get-the-data for more information

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The Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide is funded by the Climate Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). CDKN aims to help decision-makers in developing countries design and deliver climate compatible development. For more information, please go to: http://www.cdkn.org

The views expressed in this newsletter and on the Eldis website are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Eldis, IDS or its funders.


Contact details:

Eldis Programme
Institute of Development Studies
Sussex Brighton BN1 9RE
UK

Email: eldis@ids.ac.uk
Tel: +44 1273 915776
Fax: +44 1273 621202
WWW:
http://www.eldis.org/climatechange


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Eldis Resource Guides
Agriculture and food Climate change Conflict and security Evidence for Policy and Practice Gender Governance Global health ICTs for development Nutrition Rising Powers
Copyright © 2013 The Institute of Development Studies, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is: Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9RE. UK

Thursday, 15 September 2016

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

In this issue: Special focus on Latin America and the Caribbean

Climate change

With a focus across adaptation, mitigation & development, the climate change guide covers agriculture & food security, natural resource management, poverty & vulnerability, governance, health, gender, finance, & low carbon energy.

HOME LATEST NEWS TOPICS COUNTRY PROFILES JOBS CONTACT

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

15 September 2016
Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide: http://www.eldis.org/climate

This is our regular bulletin that highlights recent publications on climate change and development issues.

The documents are available without charge on the web. If you are unable to access any of these materials online and would like to receive a copy of a document as an email attachment, please contact our editor at the email address given below.


In this issue:

 



Climate change adaptation and population dynamics in Latin America and the Caribbean: perspectives from the region
Produced by: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2016)

Latin America and the Caribbean face multiple risks from a changing climate, from sea level rise to glacial melt to extreme weather and disease. Recent population trends—particularly population growth and urbanisation—will continue to be an important factor in influencing the region's vulnerability and adaptive capacity.

This policy brief shares highlights, key findings and lessons from a series of seminars on climate change adaptation organised by the Wilson Center and U.S. Agency for International Development missions across Latin America and the Caribbean. Adaptive capacity in the region is growing, and the process of consultation drew attention to projects that demonstrate innovative approaches in  participatory planning, private sector engagement, payment for ecosystem services, urban planning, and mainstreaming climate change into broader development objectives. As the impacts of climate change become more severe, however, the need for effective climate change adaptation action and resources will grow. Creating shared learning networks through convening climate change practitioners and policymakers will be an important part of the strengthening the region's capacity to adapt.

Available online at: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/final_report_-_climate_change_adaptation_in_lac.pdf Back to list
Agricultural productivity growth in Latin America and the Caribbean and other world regions: an analysis of climatic effects, convergence and catch-up
Authors: M.A. Lachaud; B.E. Bravo-Ureta; C.E. Ludena

Produced by: Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo / Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) (2016)

The agricultural sector plays a critical role in the economy of Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries. However, agricultural productivity in LAC countries is facing the rising challenge imposed by climate change, natural resource depletion and environmental degradation. For instance, recent data from FAO (2010) reveals that South America had the largest worldwide net loss of forests between 2000 and 2010, estimated at 4.0 million hectares per year.
 
This study estimates Climate Adjusted Total Factor Productivity (CATFP) for agriculture in Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) countries, while also providing comparisons with several regions of the world. Climatic variability is introduced in Stochastic Production Frontier (SPF) models by including average annual maximum temperature, precipitation and its monthly intra-year standard deviations, and the number of rainy days.

Climatic conditions have a negative impact on production becoming stronger at the end of the 2000s compared to earlier periods. An Error Correction Model is applied to investigate catch-up and convergence across LAC countries. Argentina defines the frontier in LAC and TFP convergence is found across all South American countries, Costa Rica, Mexico, Barbados and The Bahamas. Using IPCC 2014 scenarios, the study shows that climatic variability induces significant reductions in productivity (2.3% to 10.7%), over the 2013-2040 period. Estimated output losses due to climatic variability range from 9% to 20% in the LAC region depending on the scenario considered.

Available online at: https://publications.iadb.org/bitstream/handle/11319/7209/Agricultural_Productivity_Growth_in_Latin_America_and_the_Caribbean_and_Other_World_Regions_An_Analysis_of_Climatic_Effects_Convergence_and_Catch_up.pdf Back to list
Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean: policy options and research priorities
Authors: B. Feld; S. Galiani

Produced by: Social Science Research Network (2016)

Although climate change is filled with uncertainties, a broad set of policies proposed to address this issue can be grouped in two categories: mitigation and adaptation. Developed countries that are better prepared to cope with climate change have stressed the importance of mitigation, which ideally requires a global agreement that is still lacking.

This paper uses a theoretical framework to argue that in the absence of a binding international agreement on mitigation, Latin America should focus mainly on adaptation to cope with the consequences of climate change. This is not a recommendation that such economies indulge in free-riding. Instead, it is based on cost-benefit considerations, all else being equal. Only in the presence of a global binding agreement can the region hope to exploit its comparative advantage in the conservation and management of forests, which are a large carbon sink. The decision of which policies to implement should depend on the results of thorough cost-benefit analysis of competing projects, yet very little is known or has been carried out in this area to date. Research should be directed toward cost-benefit analysis of alternative climate change policies. Policymakers should compare other investments that are also pressing in the region, such as interventions to reduce water and air pollution, and determine which will render the greatest benefits.


Available online at: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/Delivery.cfm/SSRN_ID2611954_code327051.pdf?abstractid=2611954&mirid=1 Back to list
Climate-smart investment potential in Latin America: a trillion dollar opportunity
Produced by: International Finance Corporation (2016)

As a result of the successful United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's (UNFCCC) 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in December 2015, the international community has committed to limit the level of global warming at or below 2° Celsius. The historic agreement made in Paris will be implemented through country-led greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction commitments known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), which to date have been submitted by 189 countries covering 95 percent of global GHG emissions. For the private sector, NDCs1 offer a clearer signpost of the investment direction countries intend to follow as the global economy travels down a low-carbon, climate resilient highway.

There is both an urgent need and an enormous opportunity for the private sector to help turn NDCs and the climate policies and plans that underpin them into climate-smart infrastructure investments. This report offers IFC's assessment of how the formulation and adoption of NDCs by Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) governments presents the private sector with huge investment prospects of untapped climate-smart opportunities in a part of the world that is endowed with a wealth of natural capital and already is regarded as one of the great frontiers for climate smart investment.


Available online at: http://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/0d9f8fbf-2738-4432-843c-05184b9546d8/LAC+1Trillion+6-13-16+web+FINAL.pdf?MOD=AJPERES Back to list
Disabling the steering wheel? National and international actors' climate change mitigation strategies in Latin America
Produced by: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (2015)

The Latin American region holds important potential for mitigation and has a long‐standing tradition of crafting policies and drafting legislation on climate change. This article addresses the question of how Brazil, Costa Rica, and Colombia came to decide on their climate change mitigation strategies, which are based on market‐oriented policies. The analysis compares Brazilian bioethanol, Costa Rican renewable energy, and Colombia's clean development mechanism. Using the "chicken game," the best response is to "disable the steering wheel." This means that an actor reduces his or her capacity for action in order to signal a commitment to continue acting in line with his or her past behaviour.

The study assesses this strategy at the level of relationships between national and international actors. The findings show that the national actors examined here are either continuing with criticised projects, in the Brazilian case, or slowing down their mitigating strategies, in the cases of Costa Rica and Colombia, and thereby restricting their capacity for action in order to reach a better negotiating position.


Available online at: https://www.giga-hamburg.de/en/system/files/publications/wp278_rodriguez-vieira-garcia-bolivar.pdf Back to list
CARIWIG assessment of climate change impacts on selected crops and livestock in Belize and Jamaica: an example for the Caribbean Basin
Produced by: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (2016)

This study reveals that substantial negative impacts on food production should be expected from future climate scenarios such as those provided by PRECIS simulations made under different initial assumptions in Belize. This is an indicator of the fact that future plausible climates should be considered in the planning stage of any development strategy at all – local, regional and national – levels. The expected impact of climate change should be included as part of the previously included set of traditional considerations when it comes to a decision-making process related to sustainable development of Caribbean economies.

On the contrary, results obtained in Jamaica using a different approach indicated a sizable increase in rainfed yields of the sweet potato crop. Given the different methodological approaches used in both studies (and the different crops) it is very difficult at the present stage to make an inter-comparison of modelling results because the differences and uncertainties are not basically related to the impact crop models results, but also to the future climate change scenarios themselves.

As the consideration of future climate conditions is not a simple straightforward process, national meteorological authorities, universities and research centres should raise their level of commitment for the planning stage of decision-making processes and at the same time increase their capabilities for providing the necessary climate information and expertise related to climate, climate change and expected impacts of climate change. 


Available online at: http://dms.caribbeanclimate.bz/php/gateway/OKH.php?id=6751 Back to list
The implications of global climate change for fisheries management in the Caribbean
Authors: L. Nurse

Produced by: (2011)

Concerns about the socio-economic impacts of observed and projected climate change have been high on the research agendas of scientists for the last several decades. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the recent observed warming is largely human induced, and the trend will continue well into the next century owing to 'thermal inertia', related to the concentration of greenhouse gases already emitted to the atmosphere. While there is a dearth of research on the effects of climate change on commercial and artisanal fisheries in the Caribbean, valuable insights can be gleaned from observations in other jurisdictions.

This paper concludes that the consequences of climate change on Caribbean fisheries are likely to be mostly negative. Adverse impacts are expected to manifest themselves through habitat alteration and loss, reduced abundance and diversity, and shifts in distribution induced by changes in ocean currents. Stakeholders in the regional fishing industry might therefore wish to give greater credence to the challenges posed by climate change and climate variability than currently appears to be the case. Appropriate response strategies may not require radical changes in current approaches to management, but rather more effective implementation of existing and proposed arrangements.


Available online at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Leonard_Nurse/publication/233428391_The_implications_of_global_climate_change_for_fisheries_management_in_the_Caribbean/links/00b495329bf72b8f74000000.pdf?origin=publication_detail Back to list
An assessment of the economic and social impacts of climate change on the tourism sector in the Caribbean: policy brief
Produced by: United Nations [UN] Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (2013)

For most people, the Caribbean is synonymous with tropical islands with exotic flora and fauna, surrounded by blue seawater and white sandy beaches where the tourism industry can be disaggregated into cruise, all-inclusive, special interest and ecotourism. Tourism is one of the most important areas of economic activity in the Caribbean. Every year, the Caribbean welcomes 20.1 million visitors, or about 2 per cent of world tourism. Yet, Caribbean tourism is closely associated with climate; climatic factors impact on the time available to engage in leisure activities, on operating costs for tourism establishments and environmental conditions. This policy brief focuses on Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Cuba, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago.


Available online at: http://repositorio.cepal.org/bitstream/handle/11362/38379/1/LCCARl405_en.pdf Back to list

 

 


See our Climate Change Resource Guide for a complete list of new additions.

You are welcome to re-use material from this bulletin on your own website but please acknowledge Eldis as the source and include a link to the Eldis website (either to our home page or to the home page of one of our Resource Guides). Eldis data is available under a creative commons license and made it accessible via an Open API for others to re-use. In addition we have developed a number of plug-ins and modules for website content management systems such as WordPress, Joomla and Drupal to make it easier for website managers and bloggers to integrate Eldis content into their sites. See http://www.eldis.org/go/get-the-data for more information

If you only have email access to the Internet, we can send you a copy of a document as an email attachment.

If you would like to change your subscription or receive this bulletin (or any other of our subject focused email bulletins) regularly, you can register from our home page, or just email to the address below.

You can also receive this update as an RSS Newsfeed. Visit our page at: http://www.eldis.org/go/subscribe


The Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide is funded by the Climate Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). CDKN aims to help decision-makers in developing countries design and deliver climate compatible development. For more information, please go to: http://www.cdkn.org

The views expressed in this newsletter and on the Eldis website are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Eldis, IDS or its funders.


Contact details:

Eldis Programme
Institute of Development Studies
Sussex Brighton BN1 9RE
UK

Email: eldis@ids.ac.uk
Tel: +44 1273 915776
Fax: +44 1273 621202
WWW:
http://www.eldis.org/climatechange


If you would like to receive information about other services from IDS such as publications, events, training and research, please sign-up here.


Eldis Resource Guides
Agriculture and food Climate change Conflict and security Evidence for Policy and Practice Gender Governance Global health ICTs for development Nutrition Rising Powers
Copyright © 2013 The Institute of Development Studies, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is: Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9RE. UK

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